Articles and other content for Executive and Corporate Coaching

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  • Adam Gieniusz
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    Post count: 9

    Fell free to share articles, videos, books, blog posts related to corporate and executive coaching

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    There was a recent post on coachng-blog.com – an interview with Frank Wagner – a partner in the Marshall Goldsmith Group and co-founder of Stakeholder Centered Coaching. Clients include Microsoft, Intel and The Mayo Clinic.

    What I’ve found particularly interesting:
    – quite handy definition of executive coaching (EC): executive coaching makes successful people more successful
    – figures (cost) of EC charged by the Marshall Goldsmith coaches and business model based on perceived change
    – coaching model that deeply engages stakeholders

    Here’s the post: http://www.coaching-blog.com/the-executive-coaching-process-explained-interview-with-frank-wagner-phd/

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    An article from International Coaching News: “Executive Coaching – Learning From The Past and Emerging From The Future” by Noel Brady

    […] In the past coaching has often been used in a remedial way to help executives that are failing. Today, coaching is usually used when business leaders transition into a new role or face a new challenge. It can help leaders quickly develop the right mindset and behaviours to ensure success. A good coach creates an environment for their client to deepen self-awareness, stretch thinking and form sustainable breakthroughs in work performance for themselves and their teams. Although there is general consensus that good executive coaching can really accelerate personal growth and performance, it is not uncommon for the board to question whether this type of investment actually delivers worthwhile results. Unfortunately, this is because sometimes coaching just doesn’t deliver what’s promised or expected. […]

    The whole article: http://www.international-coaching-news.net/executive-coaching-learning-past-emerging-future/

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    Harvard Business Review is definitively among top sources for quality content on anything related to management and leadership. With that in mind, let me share the article I have found most stunning so far. I must admit it is much better than anything else I have ever read about listening – brief, to the point, practical and based on research among managers who were part of coach training.

    I really encourage you read this… and act upon the guidelines in your coaching work as much as in everyday conversations.

    What Great Listeners Actually Do by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman

    […We analyzed data describing the behavior of 3,492 participants in a development program designed to help managers become better coaches. As part of this program, their coaching skills were assessed by others in 360-degree assessments. We identified those who were perceived as being the most effective listeners (the top 5%). We then compared the best listeners to the average of all other people in the data set and identified the 20 items showing the largest significant difference. With those results in hand we identified the differences between great and average listeners and analyzed the data to determine what characteristics their colleagues identified as the behaviors that made them outstanding listeners. […]
    https://hbr.org/2016/07/what-great-listeners-actually-do

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    A very interesting niche for corporate coaches – working with new parents (or outside of the US – working with parents returning from parental leave).

    Why Companies Have Started to Coach New Parents by TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

    At a time when new parents may find themselves overwhelmed […] a growing number of companies are making efforts to soften the blow. They are providing employees with coaching sessions, either in person, over the phone or through small group sessions that may be broadcast over the web. The services are often available to new fathers, too. But employers are not doing this entirely out of the goodness of their corporate hearts: They are hoping to retain more women by helping them through a stressful time, while eventually improving gender diversity among their senior employees.

    Read the article > here <

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    While this applies to virtually everyone, I’m putting this here, in executive/ corporate coaching since examples are form corporate world and because – since it applies to virtually everybody, it works also for specialists, team leaders, manager, C-level managers and… yourselves.

    First, be honest with yourself. When you turned down that opportunity to speak at a big industry conference, was it really because you didn’t have the time, or were you scared to step on a stage and present?

    […]

    Then, make the behavior your own. […] Recognize these opportunities and take advantage — don’t chalk this variability up to randomness

    […]

    Finally, take the plunge. In order to step outside your comfort zone, you have to do it, even if it’s uncomfortable. Put mechanisms in place that will force you to dive in, and you might discover that what you initially feared isn’t as bad as you thought.

    Read the full article > here <

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF YOU MIXED A MASTERMIND GROUP WITH AGILE (SCRUM) PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY? THE AUTHOR OF THIS ARTICLE DID, AND SET OUT TO TRY WHETHER IT WOULD WORK OR NOT.

    While the example in the article is for a group of friends, it can be easily adjusted as corporate service or a group open for specific participants.

    Read the article > here <

    Adam Gieniusz
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    Appreciative Inquiry is one of my favourite coaching-related (but it’s not limited to coaching) concepts. Here’s a short interview from International Coaching News about this approach.

    Appreciative Inquiry (AI), developed by researcher David Cooperrider, is a strength-based approach to sustainable organisational change. It can also be applied to facilitating workshops and coaching one-on-one, known as Appreciative Coaching.

    It’s premise and framework is simple: look for prior successes to discover future steps. Particularly unique to AI are the 4-D’s: Discover (the best of the past), Dream (of what’s possible), Design (at least three pathways to get there), and Destiny (deliver the outcome). The process begins by creating an “Appreciative Topic.”

    Read the article > here < <

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